Wall Mounted Cedar Jewelry Case

This is a simple cedar slat box with a pine frame, cut in two, hinged, and mounted with two steel L-brackets. The L-brackets are mounted to a wall stud above and below the case. A small hole is drilled through the top and bottom of the case and two steel removeable pins secure the case to the brackets. Pull the pins and the case can be taken down and displayed on a flat surface.
The style is to be old farmhouse. All the surfaces are sanded smooth and there is no finish. The case will age and darken over time naturally. A simple gate latch holds the door.
Pegs were plotted on a pencil graph using a square. Two more cedar slats create a couple shelves. A detachable ring case rests inside. The dimensions are 63×24 cm (25″x 11″) and 17cm (6.75″) deep when closed.
Plumbing o-rings fit perfectly on 1/2″ dowel as a stop. The cedar slats are only 1/4″ thick so the 1.5″ pegs are cut at a 5° slope and glued in place. This keeps necklaces against the backboard.
The ring case uses 3/8″ dowels cut square and glued in place. A recycled picture stand is glued to the back and folds flat to tuck in a slat on the larger case.
The cedar is dry but still quite light in tone. Over the years the unfinished wood will age and start looking like a barn door. This piece is unnumbered and created as a fun test.

Man Cave Sign

pb_9005pb_9004pb_9003

We live outdoors, but some brothers like the cave life. It’s a good idea to mark their territory with a warning. With our friends at Sawitall.net, we did a couple test runs with a rustic man cave sign.

One is a wild west font and the other looked good with a rough edge and some bolts.

Man Cave Signs
White Pine finished in polyurethane and water-based paint.
24″x 8″
#02-28-16 MC 1 & 2
(2/2) On display at the Urban Man Cave in New Westminster.

pb_9008 pb_9007 pb_9006

 

Cedar Burl Scrying Bowl

scrying bowl_prairie_bench_crop2

An ancient (over two hundred years old) river bourne cedar scrying bowl set upon Rowan branches.

This is a one-of-a-kind, very unique showpiece and an original Prairie Bench design. The hand ground Cedar Burl Scrying Bowl has been displayed in local studios and used by fortune tellers who look into future events.

The rich burgundy tones pop on the polished surface which holds approx. 1 liter of water. The legs are twisting and interlocking English Mountain Ash known as Rowan (used for wands) and harvested on site, then joined without metal to create a stunning tripod that cradles the bowl.

IMG_2681

The burl is large with an oval shape 40″ long and 24″ across. It’s approximately 12″ thick and set on the stand, the surface is 30″ tall.

‘River bourne’ means this burl came from a tree which fell naturally, swept into a river and later harvested by a licensed tug operator. On the ocean, we call it beachcombing. The source tree fell of it’s own accord or came down naturally. The only cut was to separate the burl from the timber.

The cedar burl has deep burn marks attributed to a lightning strike. You can see in the cross section where a bolt traveled into the wood. This is a unique feature showing burns directly next to untouched wood.

448x336xprairie-bench-scrying-bowl-1.jpg.pagespeed.ic.Z90hxxZ3aa

ScreenHunter_02 Jan. 05 16.24

Scrying is a custom used by sages and fortune tellers to ‘peer’ into the future through a medium such as water in a bowl. The practice is most commonly associated with Nostradamus.

nostradamus nostradamus2

The Cedar Burl Scrying Bowl is precious and one of a kind so packaging will be extra heavy duty. The burl will need to be set carefully onto the legs once you have chosen its perfect position.

This unique showpiece is the original created by Prairie Bench Poco Canada, our small woodworkers studio that locates interesting examples of wood and uses them in designs. We use natural and safe synthetic materials to preserve and enhance features left by nature. See our moonlight test of the Cedar Scrying Bowl… click here.

321x428xprairie-bench-scrying-bowl-7.jpg.pagespeed.ic.LeHrvzg6uX 448x336xprairie-bench-scrying-bowl-6.jpg.pagespeed.ic.SbTFNg7H06

Empire Stool, Country Style

prairie_bench_western empire stool 1

This is our version of the classical empire stool with some western flare. We also refer to it as an attendant stool when teamed  up with the repose chaise.

This piece is made of reclaimed spruce and finished in our Country Rustic  finish using water-based stain and finished in polyurethane for durable shine.

 

The center seat height is lower than a regular dining chair, only 15″, and makes a great stool in the entry or anywhere you might like to stop for a minute or set down an armful. We have one in the bedroom constantly covered in clothes. This version includes a little cubby built into the frame.

Country Style Empire Stool #21-6-14-BL
Approx: 28″wide x 16″ tall x 18″ deep
Finished in polyurethane

Ready to serve: a customer submitted this beautiful shot of our stool in its new abode. Thank you!

Ready to serve: A patron submitted this beautiful shot of our empire stool design in its new abode. Thank you!

Hemlock Bistro Bar

prairie bench hemlock bistro top 5

A traditional 36″ counter bar (background right) is dwarfed by the massive Hemlock slab.

It’s big.

The piece:
Local Hemlock slab 3″ thick 60″x 20″ live edge
Local rough cut Fir timbers 4″ thick hand chiseled
Hazelnut dowels on frame
Hemlock dowels to moor slab
42″ tall
Rubber skid pads
Finished in polyurethane for easy polishing and durability

The hemlock slab was our work bench until we flipped it over and saw it had nice grain. So we polished it up with a hand planer and some high grit sand paper,  and the result was stunning.

 

prairie bench hemlock bistro top 2

prairie bench hemlock bistro top 3

prairie bench hemlock bistro top 1

This piece is a fine example of West Coast Hemlock, and very strong. It is a soft wood, an evergreen, so the surface may get nicked and bumped—but that’s part of its story. We even left some of the original mill saw marks, and there is a compression mark from early in the tree’s history. It’s a wain cut so the slab does have a slight twist, compensated by the custom frame. Belly up to the bar, we estimate the load bearing for this unit to be about eight tons, however we only recommend the table for lattes and a few brews.

 

prairie bench hemlock bistro top 4

One side has a nice arc that invites patrons to sit around the server and bartender side has a convenient knot hole for tips. Each post of the fir frame is hand chiseled and joins in a locking pattern on three sides, then pinned with sturdy hazelnut hardwood dowels. Sanded smooth, the blunt dowels and over cut edges give the piece a sturdy wild west look and in the category Country Collection.

prairie bench hemlock bistro join 3 prairie bench hemlock bistro join 2

For matching chairs, we’ll shop for some nice iron ones to complement the piece.

Size: 42″ tall x 60″ long x 20″ wide
Finished in polyurethane
#270-BL-02-14

 

 

prairie bench hemlock bistro build

Frame of the Hemlock Bistro Bar being built on the new work bench, a huge cedar slab. Looking forward making something with that monolith.