Man Cave Sign

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We live outdoors, but some brothers like the cave life. It’s a good idea to mark their territory with a warning. With our friends at Sawitall.net, we did a couple test runs with a rustic man cave sign.

One is a wild west font and the other looked good with a rough edge and some bolts.

Man Cave Signs
White Pine finished in polyurethane and water-based paint.
24″x 8″
#02-28-16 MC 1 & 2
(2/2) On display at the Urban Man Cave in New Westminster.

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Hemlock Bistro Bar

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A traditional 36″ counter bar (background right) is dwarfed by the massive Hemlock slab.

It’s big.

The piece:
Local Hemlock slab 3″ thick 60″x 20″ live edge
Local rough cut Fir timbers 4″ thick hand chiseled
Hazelnut dowels on frame
Hemlock dowels to moor slab
42″ tall
Rubber skid pads
Finished in polyurethane for easy polishing and durability

The hemlock slab was our work bench until we flipped it over and saw it had nice grain. So we polished it up with a hand planer and some high grit sand paper,  and the result was stunning.

 

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This piece is a fine example of West Coast Hemlock, and very strong. It is a soft wood, an evergreen, so the surface may get nicked and bumped—but that’s part of its story. We even left some of the original mill saw marks, and there is a compression mark from early in the tree’s history. It’s a wain cut so the slab does have a slight twist, compensated by the custom frame. Belly up to the bar, we estimate the load bearing for this unit to be about eight tons, however we only recommend the table for lattes and a few brews.

 

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One side has a nice arc that invites patrons to sit around the server and bartender side has a convenient knot hole for tips. Each post of the fir frame is hand chiseled and joins in a locking pattern on three sides, then pinned with sturdy hazelnut hardwood dowels. Sanded smooth, the blunt dowels and over cut edges give the piece a sturdy wild west look and in the category Country Collection.

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For matching chairs, we’ll shop for some nice iron ones to complement the piece.

Size: 42″ tall x 60″ long x 20″ wide
Finished in polyurethane
#270-BL-02-14

 

 

prairie bench hemlock bistro build

Frame of the Hemlock Bistro Bar being built on the new work bench, a huge cedar slab. Looking forward making something with that monolith.

Maple Writing Table

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A local tree harvester saved a nice round of Norwegian maple from the chipper and we had it slabbed for a future table and bench. The wain with the bark was wide enough to sand out and turn into an interesting table.

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There were some band saw marks that needed to be ground and the piece included metal that someone hammered in long ago.

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Next the sand with the grain to highlight the wavy quilting. The result is a surface with subtle ripples and  quite smooth. We didn’t want this piece perfectly flat , only that it caught all the available light.

The legs are hazelnut, two with the bark polished to a natural bronze and one that had lost it’s bark but had an ideal curve. They’re inset and doweled, then glued into a tripod design that’s quite stable. The surface finished in poly so it’s durable and sits just shy of 28 inches (71 cm) which makes it a decent desk height.

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The result is a space to compose or read–on a surface made by someone wonderful, nature. The maple grain is truly inspiring and the live edge creates a new environment anywhere you sit.

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Approximately 28″ tall, 42″ long and 20″ at its widest.#137-BL-06-13

 

Retro Credenza

on display in the foyer

At the request of a client, we tried our version of a retro sixties credenza, complete with shelves, three sliding doors, and those skinny little six inch legs. The project went together quite well and all was designed and cut to fit, then assembled in the kitchen, because the outdoor shop was too cold for the glue to set. The finish is stained dark walnut per the client’s wishes and the interior was wiped in poly using the natural birch color of the interior. As we were working on it, some had flashbacks of parents’ furnishings. We sort of went by memory.

The dimensions were to fit: 5′ x 1′ x 32″. The credenza was designed in pine, birch ply, with a spruce top. #130-BL-01-13