Twin Cedar Benches

Raw cedar benches just before finishing.

 

Here’s two more benches to add to our Woodland Collection. A client chose two cedar slabs for patio benches. Each was approximately 7′ long x 18″ wide and 3″ thick. This enabled us to lop off the ends and stack it upright for legs and a seat. A hemlock trestle was added for stability. We split the leg, notch out the join by hand, and glue the entire piece back together with hazelnut dowels for support.

Each bench was left with live edges, saw marks and unique knots. The surface was ground with 80 grit, then 120. The edges were ground to remove any slivers and the entire bench was soaked in poly. The bench is turned upside down and poly is poured into the open grain to make it last for years outdoors. Any finish will eventually wear away with use, sun, and rain, but the client can easily wipe some on whenever they want to restore that sheen.

Cedar has long strands that like to peel away from the core. It’s a good carving wood for vertical designs, however the cut edges can remain rough no matter how much sanding. That’s just a characteristic of this wood. Hardwoods, like maple and birch, can be polished to a fine finish from any angle, but cedar is great for that rugged, outdoor style.

#137 BL 07 13
#138 BL 07 13

Approximate sizes: 42″ long 18″ deep 17″ tall.
Wood source: hawleyscape.com

Cookery Table and Benches

Five piece cookery table and benches. 42"L x 28"W.

Five piece cookery table and benches. 42″L x 28″W.

 

A client asked for a version of our Country Lunch Bar with some storybook flair. We designed it a little smaller and included some unique features to make the pieces more memorable. The set is sturdy for heavy chores and constructed with dowel plugs for added support.

#125 – 129 BL 01-13

The Repose Bench

In our ongoing fascination with ancient furniture, we wanted to design a unique bench that used a curved surface. The trick is in the joinery. We created barrel staves out of reclaimed spruce with vertical grain lath for stability. The X frame legs were another carry over from old world designs. Though, we’ll try this again in a box frame.

The Repose, as we call it, invites the sitter to lounge appropriately. Designed for the boudoir, or a photography studio, combine a few throw pillows and it forces the seated to assume a most flattering, nonchalant and radiant pose. It’s the Prairie Bench spin on early Grecian and Roman stools, where the partaking of peeled fruit and philosophy was the order.

Check earlier post for the accompanying, smaller, Attendant Stool. The same design, but in a traditional half moon shape specifically for the grape peeler.

Both are intended to alternate as a bedroom clothes heap holder.

Repose: 90-BL-06-12, reclaimed spruce, finished in dark walnut stain and counter oil.